holga

Developing film in half the time with CineStill Df96 monobath solution

I finally had the chance to try CineStill's monobath solution, Df96. This product promises to do the job of three chemicals, all in one: developer, bath stop and fixer.

While I could see how that would save a lot of time, I wasn't so sure about the results I could get.

I've only developed 2 rolls of Ilford HP5 with this solution, but so far, I'm pretty happy with the negatives. And the best of all: I was able to do it almost twice as fast.

I love shooting film, but developing it isn't my favorite thing to do. That's why I welcome anything that makes it easier and faster, like CineStill Df96.

These are some of the images from those 2 rolls, shot with a Bronica SQ-Ai and a Holga (this one was in the camera for over a year and still turned out mostly ok).

Holga Pinhole Lens for Sony E-Mount cameras (Sony a6000)

I believe that in imperfection lays the beautiful.

That's why I shot a Holga for quite a while, why I love to shoot film or use cheap lenses on my digital cameras.

Something I've wanted to try for a while was pinhole photography. I didn't want to do it on film because it could get expensive, so I built my own pinhole lens. That worked just fine but I didn't really like the idea of having the sensor exposed through a physical hole. I went ahead and bought a Holga Pinhole Lens on eBay for 20-25 euros.

This is the lens I'm trying in this video, where everything is about embracing imperfection.

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Artist Interviews: Martina Kettner

Artist Interviews: Martina Kettner

TGIF! Also, the first Artist Interview of October is here.

Martina Kettner is a film photographer from Austria. I'm a big fan of her work as a whole, but particularly the images she creates with her Holga. Let's learn more about her and her photography!

All images in this post were made by Martina Kettner.

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About the Holga

About the Holga

Why and how this little toy camera, made entirely of plastic and worth almost nothing, can make better images than optically perfect lenses attached to high resolution cameras.

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