film photography

Taking the Rolleiflex out

I took the Rolleiflex out and tried to make a few images in Chain O'Lakes, here in Indiana. I talk a little bit about the main features, what I like, and what I don't.

Every shot has to count

 
 

I used to believe that every frame should count. A higher ratio of "keepers" would definitely mean I was a good photographer.

I was dead wrong. No, not every shot has to count.

Photography should be more about experimenting than about being certain, more about playing and less about thinking.

Developing film in half the time with CineStill Df96 monobath solution

I finally had the chance to try CineStill's monobath solution, Df96. This product promises to do the job of three chemicals, all in one: developer, bath stop and fixer.

While I could see how that would save a lot of time, I wasn't so sure about the results I could get.

I've only developed 2 rolls of Ilford HP5 with this solution, but so far, I'm pretty happy with the negatives. And the best of all: I was able to do it almost twice as fast.

I love shooting film, but developing it isn't my favorite thing to do. That's why I welcome anything that makes it easier and faster, like CineStill Df96.

These are some of the images from those 2 rolls, shot with a Bronica SQ-Ai and a Holga (this one was in the camera for over a year and still turned out mostly ok).

Hasselblad CFV II: an almost perfect system

I hadn't been so excited about a camera announcement since the Zeiss ZX1 (which by the way, hasn't been released yet -who knows if it ever will).

A few days ago Hasselblad announced the X1D II, the sucessor to their beautiful mirrorless medium format camera. New features and a greatly recuded price are always welcome. But for all purposes, it's more of the same. Just with a bigger sensor.

They also announced something else, though, something that got me really excited: the CFV II 50C.

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Shooting film is not vegan

[...] film is not a vegan product. Film is made of gelatin, which, as you may know, is a product of animal bones.

I never thought about it.

While this is not a big deal (no animals are killed to produce film), I have thought about the environmental cost of shooting film before and I have mixed feelings.

I am aware that the production of digital cameras isn't good either.

After almost two years developing film, though, it's hard for me to think that my digital cameras have had a similar footprint in the environment. Imagine the 250+ rolls of film I've shot so far: the film itself, the backing paper, the spools, the chemicals, water and paper used for development, the archival sleeves, the energy to scan them.

And I don't even have a darkroom.

Artist Interviews: Martina Kettner

Artist Interviews: Martina Kettner

TGIF! Also, the first Artist Interview of October is here.

Martina Kettner is a film photographer from Austria. I'm a big fan of her work as a whole, but particularly the images she creates with her Holga. Let's learn more about her and her photography!

All images in this post were made by Martina Kettner.

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DSLRs are the new film

As it usually happens with big corporations, it's taking much longer than anticipated. It's happening nevertheless: there's no room for mirrors in the future of mainstream photography.

They were just a patch to solve a problem that doesn't even exist with today's technology. They are irrelevant and unnecessary.

And that makes them cool.

Just kidding. Kind of.

The reason why I shoot film is because it's the only way I can make images with a tool like the Bronica.

For the same reason, plenty of people will keep using their DSLRs because it will be the only way to get that experience. Mirrorless cameras are lighter and smaller, they bring a lot of advantages but they change the way we take photographs.

And of course, there are people who'll embrace the flaws of DSLRs, especially the early ones that came out years ago.

DSLRs are the new film. They are about to become a niche in photography, used by some only because of the unique experience (and probably look) you can achieve with them.

I'm excited about it.

Cinestill Df96, black and white film developing made easy?

Eduardo Pavez runs a great channel about film photography on YouTube. In his latest video he tries Cinestill Df96, a monobath solution that promises to make developing -black and white film- much easier.

Instead of dealing with multiple chemicals (developer, stop bath, fixer...), this solution does it all. Pour it in the tank and after 3 minutes your negatives will be ready to wash.

I can't wait to try it myself -I don't know of any place here in Europe that carries Df96 just yet.

I can see one gotcha with this new product: achieving the right temperature. The trick is to get the solution to the temperature indicated for your film stock and exposure.

If you've developed film before, you know that getting any solution to the right temperature can be the most challenging part of all! Surely, one of the most time consuming steps.

I have to hold off on giving my final opinion on this new monobath solution until I try it, but it looks like the savings in time from using just one chemical can be erased trying to get the solution to the right temperature.