art

The world needs you

I've been told many times -especially when working with film- about the right way to do things.

"Look at the masters", they say. "Do what they did", they repeat.

"It was all academic. You were taught to paint like somebody else, made me not want to paint at all. You want to paint your own way!"

Georgia O'Keeffe said it better than anyone else. Using just charcoal, she created beautiful -but radical for her time- abstract drawings. That wasn't what she was supposed to be doing. And yet, she became one of the greatest American artists of the 20th century.

Look at the masters, and then "kill" them and carve your own path. The world doesn't need another Ansel Adams or another Henri Cartier-Bresson.

The world needs you.

Forever a beginner

Experience doesn't matter when it comes to photography. If it did, all the greats would've created their best images at the end of their careers. That's rarely the case.

Actually, I'd argue that experience makes us and our art predictable. The more we do something, the less likely we are to try something new.

I believe we should strive to be beginners forever.

You don't have to explain your art

We create because we love creating.

Sometimes, there's no need for an explanation or a deeper meaning. No need for a grandiose project or a long-term vision.

It can be all about the act of creating something new.

Holga Pinhole Lens for Sony E-Mount cameras (Sony a6000)

I believe that in imperfection lays the beautiful.

That's why I shot a Holga for quite a while, why I love to shoot film or use cheap lenses on my digital cameras.

Something I've wanted to try for a while was pinhole photography. I didn't want to do it on film because it could get expensive, so I built my own pinhole lens. That worked just fine but I didn't really like the idea of having the sensor exposed through a physical hole. I went ahead and bought a Holga Pinhole Lens on eBay for 20-25 euros.

This is the lens I'm trying in this video, where everything is about embracing imperfection.

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12 significant photographs a year

12 significant photographs a year

This quote by Ansel Adams is used quite often, perhaps to motivate photographers who feel they aren't making enough good images. A few images this year, a few more next year, and so on can become a significant body of work over time.

I have 2 problems with this approach, though.

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